Month: March 2012

shinrin-yoku

“Go sit in the woods.” My friend Bobbie and I used to joke that if anyone ever complained to either of us about any type of malady or imbalance—physical, emotional, spiritual, whatever—that this would thereafter be our universal refrain and prescription, as we each…

a woodworker’s rite of passage

I am pretty much 100% self-taught as a woodworker. I would glean what I could from the many carpenters I worked with over the years, some of whom were true masters of the trade, while a great many others taught me by example what…

early risers

With all the warm weather of late, as well as the practically non-existent ‘winter’ that just ended, my fruit trees are breaking their dormancy VERY early—frighteningly early. I have kept some records of bloom dates and spring frosts for the past 9 years in…

crop trees

In the early years of owning my woodland, when out in the woods, I had a tendency to look at each of my trees in isolation—without the context of their immediate surroundings. “Here’s a Yellow birch, here’s a Sassafras, here’s a Red Maple”, etc….I…

patience

For the past six years, I have volunteered with the New York State Master Forest Owner program, which has allowed me to meet a number of local woodland owners, and to walk their properties with them, offering thoughts on woodlot management. On one of…

why is he talking about carrots?

I am a big carrot eater, so have become the default carrot grower in our household. If you have ever grown carrots yourself, you may know that one of the challenges in sowing the seed is to spread them thinly yet evenly over the…

look up part 2

I attended a chainsaw safety class a few years ago, after having spent nearly 20 years cutting and felling trees without any sort of formal instruction. Humbling to realize how much you don’t know. First time I used a chainsaw was in August of…

low stumps

Low stumps = good etiquette. American Beech (Fagus grandifolia)……… …….and White Ash (Fraxinus americana).

look up

When I first started looking at my forest with an eye toward managing it for increased health and faster growth—for MORE BIG TREES, basically—I was still in the habit of assessing a tree primarily by looking at its trunk. “Hey, that’s a big one!”…

firewood—which trees?

I spent some time in my woodlot a few weeks ago, marking the trees that I will harvest for firewood this year. As I worked my way through each stand, inspecting trunks and crowns in order to find the trees best suited to end…